6 Post-Graduation Jobs for Photography Majors

6 Post-Graduation Jobs for Photography Majors

In recent years, photography has become a vital component of nearly every industry, boosting the demand for experienced photographers and up-and-coming photography majors. Here are some ideas of the different photography jobs available and how to launch your career.

Types of photography jobs

Wedding photography

Weddings continue to keep freelance photographers busy on weekends. Although every guest is a potential photographer, couples still turn to professionals to capture the main event and formal portraits. Stand out from your competition by offering post-processing or print packages.

Photojournalism

Be first on the scene for breaking news if you can score a rare staff photographer job with a news site or publication. Assignments can range from local sports to national politics, with the potential to capture historical moments in action.

Product and brand photography

Get your photos featured in catalogs or social media working with brands to create promotional images for their products and services (like in this picture of our desktop Metal Prints!). Experience in art direction will help you capture creative still-life photos of everything from socket wrenches to sofas.

Portrait photography

Help families and couples put their best face forward as a freelance portrait photographer. Work in a studio or go out on location to shoot family sessions, engagement portraits, pet photography, or professional headshots.

Forensic photography

Use your camera to collect evidence at crime scenes as a forensic photographer. If you have an interest in criminology and an eye for detail, your photos could be used in court to solve crimes and resolve disputes.

Real estate photography

The rise in online property listings has created a need for real estate photographers to work with estate agents to photograph residential and commercial properties for marketing materials. Get your foot in the door in this relatively new photographic opportunity if you love architecture.

Getting started

Look for opportunities to work as an assistant to an established photographer in your chosen field. This might mean more time doing post-processing and less time behind the lens at first, but you could gain valuable contacts while learning the business from a seasoned pro.

Be prepared to cold-call prospective clients and employers, especially if there are particular agencies or brands you’re interested in. And, make sure your portfolio contains strong examples of your work relevant to the field you’re pursuing! Keep your portfolio updated to reflect your current style and specialty.

Showcasing your work

Build a professional website with samples of your work so clients can contact you with inquiries or bookings. For networking and greater online visibility, post your online portfolio on Behance. If you have a studio or office space, create a gallery-style display with framed or canvas prints of your work to impress visiting clients.

Consider registering with a reputable stock photo licensing site to put your noncommissioned photos to work for you. Although you might not retire early from your royalties, stock photography can be a way to earn some passive income while developing your portfolio.

Now’s the time to follow your dreams and put your new photography degree to work! Seasoned pros, how did you get started? Let us (and the recent grads reading this!) know in the comments.

Thanks to M Harris Studios and Stewart Photography for some of the images in this post! 

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